Speaker: The Last Job

You just hosted a Zoom presentation.  Congratulations.  You did it.  But you still have one more important detail to complete.  Then the job is done.  Here are a few tips professional speakers use to complete that last job.

Speaker:  The Last Job

When the speech is completed, have your Host let the audience know you will be available on-site to discuss any unanswered questions.   Greet each audience member warmly, ask where they are from and politely answer their questions.

After your “speaking area” has been cleared and the audience is departing, take your time to retrieve all your visual aids, personal computer cords and support materials.  A few extra minutes double checking this area is much better than calling your Host several days later for help locating a missing visual aid.

Do not let your Host leave the room without a final “thank you”.   This is the perfect time to also ask your Host if the message of your presentation could help other departments in their company.  If the answer is “yes”, get a name and contact information.  Ask your Host to make the first call to this new contact introducing you.

Also ask your Host if they could write a testimonial letter briefly explaining the value your presentation provided for the audience.  Offer to write the first DRAFT for their  edits and comments.   Kindly ask them to transcribe the final version onto their letterhead, sign it and return it to you by email.  Also ask the Host to send the ORIGINAL letter to you in the regular mail.

On the way out of the hotel or conference center, if you again meet audiences members in the hallway, be sure to wave or smile as you pass.  

Stay in touch with your Host with a call every six months.  The purpose of the call will be do let the Host know you are thinking of them.  Also ask if there is anyone in their network who may benefit from your message.   

Make sure you add your Host to your Blog, Newsletter and email list.

Zoom Host:  The Last Job

Just prior to concluding the Zoom call, let the audience know you will remain on the call for the next 15 minutes to answer any additional questions via “Chat”.  Coordinate this with your Host, who will read the questions.  Or if you prefer to handle this yourself, pick out those questions that have the most relevance to your presentation.

When the 15 minutes of Post-Presentation questions is almost up, notify your audience that you have time for only one more question.  Offer your email again and say it slowly offering to address those questions you still have not answered. 

Also offer your web site address again for those interested in obtaining more information about your speaking work or downloading some of your web site’s information.

Immediately after leaving the virtual meeting, call your host on the phone and thank them again for bringing you in as the speaker.

Ask the Host if there are other groups in their company or network that may benefit from your presentation.  If the answer is “yes’, kindly ask the Host to email or text you that person’s name and contact information.   Also ask the Host to make the first contact with that person explaining the benefits your presentation just provided to the Host’s audience. 

Ask your Host if they would be willing to write a testimonial letter briefly explaining the value your presentation provided for the audience.  Offer to write the first DRAFT for their edits and comments.  Kindly ask them to transcribe the final version onto their letterhead, sign it and return it t by email.  Also ask the Host to send the ORIGINAL letter to you in the regular mail.

Stay in touch with your Host with a call every six month.  The purpose of the call will be do let the Host know you are thinking of them.  Also ask if there is anyone in their network who may benefit from your message.  

Make sure you add your Host to your Blog, Newsletter and email list.

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Bill Driscoll

Bill Driscoll

Twenty-four years as a Keynote Speaker to Fortune 500 Companies and Trade Associations

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